Entradas con la etiqueta ‘Previsión energética’

Las pymes españolas podrían ahorrarse 4.105 millones de euros con medidas de eficiencia energética

Martes, 20 de Junio de 2017

Gas Natural Fenosa cifra en 4.105 millones de euros el potencial de ahorro energético de las pymes españolas.

En rueda de prensa, el director general de la Fundación Gas Natural Fenosa, Martí Solà, ha recalcado que esta cifra representa el 0,37% del PIB nacional español en 2016.

El estudio de eficiencia energética en las pymes, que cumple su novena edición, indica que las pequeñas y medianas empresas españolas tienen un potencial de ahorro del 24,2% de la energía que utilizan. De este total, el 8,8% corresponde al ahorro en iluminación y el 15,4% restante en los demás usos energéticos.

Ello se traduce en unos 35.574 gigavatios/hora, que, según Gas Natural, es la energía que se necesita para abastecer el consumo eléctrico en Galicia durante dos años.

Solà ha recalcado que este ahorro permitiría dejar de emitir 9,96 millones de toneladas de CO2 en la atmósfera, una cifra equiparable a la cantidad emitida por 2,7 millones de turismos.

Según el Índice de Eficiencia Energética elaborado por Gas Natural, España ha obtenido una puntuación media de 5,9 puntos sobre 10.

Por comunidades autónomas, Canarias obtiene la puntuación más alta, con 6,7 puntos sobre 10. Por encima de la media nacional se encuentran también Baleares, Cantabria, Castilla y León, la Comunidad Valenciana, Extremadura, Galicia, Murcia y Navarra.

Por debajo de los 5,9 puntos están Aragón, Asturias, Castilla La Mancha, Cataluña, la Comunidad de Madrid, País Vasco y La Rioja.

Por sectores, las mejores notas se obtuvieron en la hostelería (6,1) y la restauración (6,2), mientras que las más bajas fueron para la industria (5,6) y los servicios profesionales (5,8).

Como conclusiones del estudio, Solà ha destacado que se mantiene un crecimiento “sostenido” del índice desde su creación en 2005 y que la mayoría de las comunidades autónomas han aumentado su puntuación respecto a la última medición en 2015, con la excepción de Asturias y Cantabria.

Además, el director general ha querido enfatizar que aún continúa existiendo un “recorrido de mejora de la eficiencia energética”, pero ha querido señalar, también, que la participación en programas de eficiencia energética por parte de las empresas es muy baja. En concreto, la participación se sitúa alrededor del 4%.

Por último, Solà ha indicado que la tecnología led se ha convertido en predominante en este índice respecto 2015, pasando del 26,1% al 53,1%. Solà ha confiado en que, en las próximas ediciones, este peso continuará mejorando.

El estudio se ha elaborado a partir de entrevistas telefónicas a un total de 2.000 empresas españolas con una plantilla de hasta 250 trabajadores.

Fuente: elperiódicodelaenergía

Energy is the new internet

Lunes, 30 de Enero de 2017

Posted in www.techcrunch.com on Jan 22, 2017 by Brian Lakamp

If you’re not paying attention to what’s going on in energy, you should. We’ve seen this movie before. Spoiler alert: There’s massive economic opportunity ahead. How massive? Imagine standing in 1992, knowing that Google, Akamai, Netflix, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, BuzzFeed and Uber lay ahead.

This time it’s the “enernet,” not the internet, that will transform our lives. The story is the same, though the players have changed.

Here’s the tee up. Across the country, incumbent network providers operate highly centralized networks in their respective cities. Then, scrappy local outfits start serving the market with innovative, distributed technology. These startups create competition, and a new network emerges atop the legacy network.

That was the backdrop 30 years ago when a little thing called the internet emerged. Startups like CompuServe, AOL, EarthLink, Netcom and a host of other local ISPs kicked off the conversion from analog to digital by offering internet access over existing cable and telco networks.

Today, the actors are SolarCity, Sunrun and a host of others moving us off fossil fuels and into clean energy supported by smart equipment, services and software, offered atop existing utility networks. This time, it’s the enernet.

Enernet. Noun. A dynamic, distributed, redundant and multi-participant energy network built around clean energy generation, storage and delivery and serving as the foundation for smart cities.

There is a long list of enernet innovators now emerging. They are building nanogrids, microgrids, distributed energy resources and virtual power plants. They are creating new, intelligent building materials and smart lighting. They are deploying new networks and intelligence that are driving down costs and improving services.

At heart, the enernet is the foundation for smart-city tech, including the “Internet of Things,” distributed systems, interconnected backbones and networking technologies, EV-charging services and autonomous vehicles, to name a few. These technologies will drive dramatic change and force us to rethink our cities, municipal services and sectors like transportation, insurance, real estate and financial services.

From the enernet evolution will come smart cities that are an order-of-magnitude smarter, healthier and safer. The new network will also present quantum leaps in energy security and emergency resilience that can stand in the face of superstorms or cyberattacks.

Hold on to your seats. We’re at the early stages of something immense.

Still, I hear the seeds of fear and doubt. There is an oft-cited refrain that the transition will cost a lot and take a long time. That’s absolutely silly. We don’t look back at the internet transformation from analog to digital and think, “Wow, that was slow and cost a ton of money. We should have stuck with the typewriter and landline.” Fact is, it was blazingly fast and driven by those who understood the spend as leveraged investment, not cost center.

Likewise, the move to clean energy will seem fast and prudent as solar and energy storage continue to scale, smart cities accelerate and prices continue their fall.


I also hear “the utilities are in big trouble.” Let’s not be simplistic. Google didn’t kill Comcast. Comcast is doing just fine. The utilities that own transmission and distribution networks (the wires companies) have enormous value and opportunity ahead. There is no way that the transition happens without the participation of these companies, and there is considerable economic upside ahead for them. Forward-thinking utilities — Consolidated Edison, National Grid and others — see what’s coming and are poised to thrive in the enernet world.

Sure, fossil-fuel generators and suppliers have challenges ahead, just like the content companies were challenged by newer, more flexible, cost-effective content producers. It’ll be up to the management teams at these companies to de-risk the future with intelligent investment and acquisitions. Hats off to folks like David Crane, a visionary who worked to drive that transition at NRG Energy. We will see more of that type of leadership again over the next 10 years as market dynamics shift and outcomes become more obvious and urgent to the incumbents.

That said, enernet innovation, like innovation in every other sector, is unlikely to originate from within the incumbents. If you don’t believe me, read books like The Innovator’s Dilemma by Clayton Christensen or this article from Accenture that asserts “corporate innovation does not work.” Unless a Lou Gerstner or Steve Jobs is at the helm of an incumbent, innovation will be acquired, not grown.

This backdrop presents incredible opportunity for startups and early investors in the space. I’m excited to be part of that, and I hope that talented entrepreneurs turn their attention from the app economy to the enernet. There’s enormous upside.

As I said, we’ve seen this movie. Let’s stop acting surprised, and instead start acting. An economic powerhouse awaits the United States. We’ll be thankful we chose to become a worldwide enernet leader, as this evolution creates a new kind of healthy, robust economy.


Read the full article at: https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/22/energy-is-the-new-new-internet/

If you’re not paying attention to what’s going on in energy, you should. We’ve seen this movie before. Spoiler alert: There’s massive economic opportunity ahead. How massive? Imagine standing in 1992, knowing that Google, Akamai, Netflix, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, BuzzFeed and Uber lay ahead.

This time it’s the “enernet,” not the internet, that will transform our lives. The story is the same, though the players have changed.

Here’s the tee up. Across the country, incumbent network providers operate highly centralized networks in their respective cities. Then, scrappy local outfits start serving the market with innovative, distributed technology. These startups create competition, and a new network emerges atop the legacy network.

That was the backdrop 30 years ago when a little thing called the internet emerged. Startups like CompuServe, AOL, EarthLink, Netcom and a host of other local ISPs kicked off the conversion from analog to digital by offering internet access over existing cable and telco networks.

Today, the actors are SolarCity, Sunrun and a host of others moving us off fossil fuels and into clean energy supported by smart equipment, services and software, offered atop existing utility networks. This time, it’s the enernet.

Enernet. Noun. A dynamic, distributed, redundant and multi-participant energy network built around clean energy generation, storage and delivery and serving as the foundation for smart cities.

There is a long list of enernet innovators now emerging. They are building nanogrids, microgrids, distributed energy resources and virtual power plants. They are creating new, intelligent building materials and smart lighting. They are deploying new networks and intelligence that are driving down costs and improving services.

At heart, the enernet is the foundation for smart-city tech, including the “Internet of Things,” distributed systems, interconnected backbones and networking technologies, EV-charging services and autonomous vehicles, to name a few. These technologies will drive dramatic change and force us to rethink our cities, municipal services and sectors like transportation, insurance, real estate and financial services.

From the enernet evolution will come smart cities that are an order-of-magnitude smarter, healthier and safer. The new network will also present quantum leaps in energy security and emergency resilience that can stand in the face of superstorms or cyberattacks.

Hold on to your seats. We’re at the early stages of something immense.

Still, I hear the seeds of fear and doubt. There is an oft-cited refrain that the transition will cost a lot and take a long time. That’s absolutely silly. We don’t look back at the internet transformation from analog to digital and think, “Wow, that was slow and cost a ton of money. We should have stuck with the typewriter and landline.” Fact is, it was blazingly fast and driven by those who understood the spend as leveraged investment, not cost center.

Likewise, the move to clean energy will seem fast and prudent as solar and energy storage continue to scale, smart cities accelerate and prices continue their fall.

I also hear “the utilities are in big trouble.” Let’s not be simplistic. Google didn’t kill Comcast. Comcast is doing just fine. The utilities that own transmission and distribution networks (the wires companies) have enormous value and opportunity ahead. There is no way that the transition happens without the participation of these companies, and there is considerable economic upside ahead for them. Forward-thinking utilities — Consolidated Edison, National Grid and others — see what’s coming and are poised to thrive in the enernet world.

Sure, fossil-fuel generators and suppliers have challenges ahead, just like the content companies were challenged by newer, more flexible, cost-effective content producers. It’ll be up to the management teams at these companies to de-risk the future with intelligent investment and acquisitions. Hats off to folks like David Crane, a visionary who worked to drive that transition at NRG Energy. We will see more of that type of leadership again over the next 10 years as market dynamics shift and outcomes become more obvious and urgent to the incumbents.

That said, enernet innovation, like innovation in every other sector, is unlikely to originate from within the incumbents. If you don’t believe me, read books like The Innovator’s Dilemma by Clayton Christensen or this article from Accenture that asserts “corporate innovation does not work.” Unless a Lou Gerstner or Steve Jobs is at the helm of an incumbent, innovation will be acquired, not grown.

This backdrop presents incredible opportunity for startups and early investors in the space. I’m excited to be part of that, and I hope that talented entrepreneurs turn their attention from the app economy to the enernet. There’s enormous upside.

As I said, we’ve seen this movie. Let’s stop acting surprised, and instead start acting. An economic powerhouse awaits the United States. We’ll be thankful we chose to become a worldwide enernet leader, as this evolution creates a new kind of healthy, robust economy.

Read the full article at: https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/22/energy-is-the-new-new-internet/

Informe sobre el potencial de la ecoinnovación en España

Martes, 27 de Diciembre de 2016

La Obra Social “la Caixa” ha presentado recientemente el primer informe “Outlook Ecoinnovación y su potencial en España 2017. Este informe nace con la finalidad de identificar las principales tendencias mundiales que se están desarrollando en el entorno de la ecoinnovación empresarial y el potencial económico, que tendría su implementación en las empresas españolas.

El informe recoge casos reales de empresas que operan en España y que demuestran que la eficiencia en la reducción de CO2 en los posibles escenarios de futuro, también supone un importante ahorro en costes de materias primas y energía, así como un aumento del valor de los aspectos intangibles que valora el mercado.

Resultados del Informe

Los resultados demuestran que la ecoinnovación es una estrategia rentable para la empresa, supone una clara mejora del medio ambiente en todos los ámbitos (energía, residuos, cambio climático, etc.) y es compatible con la competitividad empresarial.

El estudio demuestra que los consumidores tienen una mejor percepción de los productos verdes, lo que obliga a aumentar las exigencias de integración y transparencia de las grandes empresas, y ello genera un efecto de tracción, que obliga a que los requisitos ambientales de sus proveedores sean mayores. El agroalimentario, que supone un 5,2 % del PIB de España, con una facturación de 55.000 millones de euros, es el sector en el que los consumidores exigen un mejor comportamiento ambiental.

Además, las empresas afrontan una situación en la que los resultados económicos no son el único elemento que da valor a la empresa, sino que hay aspectos intangibles que deben tenerse en cuenta y que solo se pueden lograr si la ecoinnovación se incorpora a su estrategia. La ecoinnovación no es una moda pasajera, sino que es la única vía que permite mejorar la competitividad de las empresas y es, al mismo tiempo, sostenible con el entorno

El valor de los aspectos intangibles en el mercado ha pasado de un 17 a un 84 % entre 1975 y 2015. Las empresas que optan por la ecoinnovación tienen un 15 % de crecimiento anual más, frente al crecimiento plano de sus mercados.

Tendencias de Ecoinnovación para el 2017

  • Remanufactura; Remanufacturar consiste en dar a un producto recuperado un nuevo uso con unas garantías similares a las del producto originario, para generar crecimiento económico, mejoras ambientales y más puestos de trabajo. En España se podría alcanzar una facturación de 4.800 millones de euros en el año 2030 en actividades remanufactureras, sobre todo en los sectores aeroespaciales y de la automoción.
  • Tracción de cadenas de suministro; Desde las materias primas hasta el fin de la vida de un producto, las grandes empresas desean tener cada vez más información de su cadena de suministros con el fin de aumentar la transparencia, identificar los puntos clave para la mejora de los procesos y gestionar los riesgos. Como consecuencia de una mayor presión de los mercados, de una legislación cada vez más exigente y de la necesidad y voluntad de mostrar una buena imagen corporativa, las empresas buscan cada vez más incorporar en su cadena de suministro a proveedores con una mejor actuación ambiental.
  • Servitización; Consiste en transformar un modelo de negocio para pasar de la venta de un producto a ofrecer un servicio. Esta ecoinnovación responde a una tendencia social en la que cada vez se apuesta menos por la posesión de productos y más por la vivencia de experiencias a través del acceso a servicios. Esta tendencia genera importantes beneficios por la atracción de nuevos clientes, la diferenciación respecto a la competencia, la ampliación de servicios ofrecidos o la mayor fidelización de cliente.
  • La gestión del Big data; La gestión de grandes bases de datos como estrategia para tomar mejores decisiones, optimizar procesos y prevenir riesgos. Big Data se refiere a la disponibilidad de grandes volúmenes de datos (sobre clientes, operaciones, procesos, mercados, recursos, tendencias, etc.) que se van recopilando a velocidades cada vez más elevadas gracias al Internet de las Cosas. Ello es posible gracias al hecho de que la conectividad entre empresas, dispositivos y usuarios es cada vez mayor. Una adecuada gestión de esta información abre posibilidades de negocio, así como de una mejor gestión de los recursos.

Se puede acceder al Informe en la siguiente dirección: http://bit.ly/2hcEdF3

The Number of Commercial and Industrial Demand Response Sites is Expected to Surpass 1 Million by 2023

Sábado, 1 de Noviembre de 2014

A new report from Navigant Research examines the demand response (DR) market for the commercial and industrial (C&I) sector, including global market forecasts for capacity, sites, and revenue through 2023.

In recent years, DR in the commercial and industrial sector has matured and is now treated in some electricity markets as a resource equivalent to generation.  The changing resource mix in electric grids globally is creating more opportunities for DR to play a pivotal role in balancing loads and ensuring a reliable supply of electricity, particularly during peak demand episodes. According to a new report from Navigant Research, the number of worldwide commercial and industrial DR sites is expected to grow from 92,000 in 2014 to more than 1 million in 2023.

“Although the uncertainty surrounding the pending federal court case regarding the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s rules on DR compensation has cast a cloud over the sector, there are plenty of other drivers that can lead to continued expansion in the future,” says Brett Feldman, senior research analyst with Navigant Research.  “Currently, almost all of the C&I DR activity is taking place in the United States, but this leadership position is expected to erode over the next 10 years, as all world regions move from pilot programs to building out full-scale markets.”

As DR has taken on a more prominent role, regulators and other market participants are calling for tighter requirements to ensure reliable operations and efficient markets.  Market rule changes that attempt to standardize rules between DR and generation may place more requirements and risk on DR, according to the report.  As DR is relied upon more, it is likely to fall under greater regulatory supervision.

The report, “Demand Response for Commercial & Industrial Markets,” examines the C&I DR market in five major geographic regions.  The study provides an analysis of the major market drivers and barriers, as well as global market players and dynamics, associated with C&I DR.  Global market forecasts for C&I DR capacity, sites, and revenue, broken out by segment and region, extend through 2023.  The report also examines the key technologies related to C&I DR, as well as the competitive landscape.  An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

More Than 1.5 Million Fuel Cell Systems Are Expected to be Shipped Annually by 2023

Lunes, 13 de Octubre de 2014

A new report from Navigant Research provides a global analysis of major developments and trends in the fuel cell industry, including global market forecasts for fuel cell systems and capacity shipped and system revenue through 2023.

During 2013 and 2014, the fuel cell market continued to see the greatest demand from stationary applications, including utility-scale fuel cells, fuel cells for industrial and commercial buildings, and fuel cells for residential power.  The spread of distributed generation (DG), which represents a shift away from traditional centralized power generation model toward a more diverse and resilient grid infrastructure, is helping to drive strong interest in stationary fuel cells.  According to a new report from Navigant Research, worldwide shipments of fuel cell systems are expected to exceed 1.5 million annually by 2023.

“Fuel cells fit neatly into the spectrum of technologies that support the DG movement,” says Lisa Jerram, principal research analyst with Navigant Research.  “As a result, Navigant Research sees the stationary fuel cell sector as the one with the strongest global potential, in terms of fuel cell systems shipped, within the fuel cell market in both the near- and long-term.”

Another significant trend during the last 2 years, according to the report, has been the revival of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs).  The market is seeing a surge of media attention as several automakers prepare to launch commercial FCVs in 2015.  FCV sales will likely drive growth in the transportation fuel cell market, which is expected surpass the stationary sector in terms of capacity in 2017 even though more stationary fuel cells will be shipped than FCVs.

The report, “Fuel Cells Annual Report 2014,” provides a global analysis of major developments and trends in the fuel cell industry, with a focus on the stationary, portable, and transportation sectors.  It features an analysis of actual fuel cell systems and capacity shipped from 2010 to 2013, segmented by region, sector, application, electrolyte, and fuel type, as well as system revenue.  Global market forecasts for fuel cell systems and capacity shipped and system revenue extend through 2023.  The study also includes a special section on the growing interest in DG and profiles more than 30 companies active in the global fuel cell industry.  An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

360º Energy Outlook: Seguridad energética sostenible. Riesgos y oportunidades estratégicas para las empresas

Lunes, 7 de Febrero de 2011

Recientemente la compañía británica Lloyd’s, especialista en seguros y análisis del riesgo, ha publicado el informe “Sustainable energy security. Stategic risks and opportunities for business”. En él se afirma que hemos entrado en un período de profunda incertidumbre sobre cuál va a ser, en un futuro, la fuente de energía para generar electricidad, calor y movilidad; y cuanto se va a tener que pagar por ella.

Cada día escuchamos noticias sobre las dificultades que están por venir, pero con el petróleo, el gas y el carbón ampliamente accesibles, y en gran medida susceptibles de ser distribuidos allí donde se necesiten, los malos tiempos todavía no han llegado. No obstante, los recientes sucesos en el norte de África, afectando a algunos de los principales países productores de petróleo y gas, incrementan la incertidumbre y por tanto, la relevancia de las conclusiones de este informe.

Conscientes de ello, en DinamE hemos preparado este “360º Energy Outlook”, resumen de la publicación original de Lloyd’s, cuyo primer propósito es recordar al lector que todas las empresas, no sólo las del sector energético, han de tener en cuenta cómo ellos, sus proveedores y sus clientes se verán afectados por unos suministros de energía menos fiables y más caros.

Puede descargarse el resumen del informe, en español, aqui: 110221_DinamE 360_Seguridad Energetica

En todo caso, recomendamos la lectura completa del informe, en inglés, accesible en la web de Chatham House: http://www.chathamhouse.org.uk/publications/papers/view/-/id/891/